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$948,276 DISTRIBUTED TO COMMUNITIES IN 2019
$7,292,633 TOTAL DISTRIBUTED TO COMMUNITIES

Lani Evans

Why the Women's Fund?

I believe the Women's Fund plays a role in accelerating change for women in Aotearoa. We still face serious, systemic issues in New Zealand – increasing inequality, family violence, sexual violence and the gender pay gap to name a few.

 

How or where do you see the Women's Fund making a difference?

The Women's Fund provides us with an opportunity to rectify some of these systemic challenges and demonstrate the impact of investing in women and girls.

 

Who is your biggest female role model/inspiration and why?

Dame Margaret Sparrow is a role model for me, because she has dedicated her life to reproductive rights and equality in Aotearoa. When she was 21, Dame Margaret gave herself a DIY abortion, which she was lucky enough to survive. She found the choices she made unacceptable and went on to become a Doctor who pioneered sexual health services in Aotearoa New Zealand, opened our first abortion and vasectomy clinics and was one of the first women in New Zealand to try the oral contraceptive. Now, at 83, she’s still advocating for change – trying to make changes to New Zealand law to remove abortion form the crimes act and make it instead, a health issue for women. Her dedication to change and her perseverance are incredible.

 

Finish this sentence: "In 10 years' time, I want women and girls in New Zealand to…"

"...be valued for the unique contributions they make to the world, and to the workplace, and experience a world where equality and equity for everyone are so normalised that they are taken for granted."

Lani Evans